Practical Marketing: Part Two

Marketing

More On Marketing Your Practice

This is the second in a series of Practice Quick Tips addressing proven marketing concepts for expanding your practice. Here are a few more simple but effective ideas that you can implement to improve your marketing efforts and bring more business in the front door. (More to follow in subsequent issues.)

Good Will Ambassadors:

Enthusiastic patients/clients who love your care can become good will ambassadors for your practice.

What is a “good will ambassador”?

Per the dictionary, “good will” means: “an intangible, saleable asset arising from the reputation of a business and its relations with its customers.” And, an “ambassador” is: “an authorized representative.” All you have to do in your practice to create this “good will ambassador” is deliver perfect, caring service to your patients/clients. (Easier said than done – we will cover this in a future newsletter.)

We are certain that you are willing for a fair number of your clientele to be good will ambassadors for your practice and for them to go forth and tell other people to come and see you, right?

However, these enthusiastic patients/clients often don’t know how to promote you and you need to give them some direction.

Directions:

In getting to know who your clients really are, you will find out many important details, such as where they work, what clubs they belong to, what teams they play on, and so on. These are all marketing opportunities for you. For instance, in their workplace there may be a bulletin board where the patient/client could (as a Good Will Ambassador) put up your practice newsletter. Or do they have “lunch and learn” discussions in their place of work where you could be invited in to speak? Do the clubs they belong to have bulletin boards or places to put up your business cards, etc.?

Community Newspapers:

In your area, there are usually one or more community weekly newspapers published and circulated. These papers tend to be read front to back far more frequently than daily papers, and are generally cheaper to advertise in. Plus, ads in these papers usually have a higher frequency of response. Any ad placed in a newspaper should be big enough to grab or draw attention to it, and a splash of colour to draw peoples’ eyes to it is always good. Be sure to run your ad more than one time as it often takes 3 insertions before you see the results. Therefore, the Rule of Thumb is to run an ad at least 3 times before you judge the results. Have fun with this!

>Click here to read Practical Marketing: Part Three

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